TOKYO METROPOLITAN GOVERNMENT

TOKYO CAREER GUIDE

OUR VOICE

Ko Enshi

Ko Enshi

MY TOKYO STORY

  • Age18

    Influenced by my father’s advice, I got interested in Japan’s economy, and decided to study in Japan.
  • Age19

    On my first trip to Tokyo, I was amazed by the numbers of people at Tokyo’s stations!
  • Age20

    I participated keenly in my internship and learned the basics of how to work in a company and how members of society think.
  • Age23

    I was assigned to rental WiFi stores in Narita and Haneda airports, with the important management role of managing over 20 staff.
  • Age26

    Moved to sales the Sales Division. I am responsible for customers at over 80 companies, and actively take on new experiences every day.

message

Tokyo lets me experience independent life without being too far from my family back home, and it’s a place filled with opportunity.

Ko Enshi message

I made new discoveries by plunging into an unknown world. Tokyo is not far away when seen from Asia, and it is a place where one can live independently. Being away from my parents nurtured my awareness of their importance like never before. When I meet my parents again, I try to treat them like a dutiful child. If I feel lonely, I can get my family on the phone, and it’s close enough that I can get a flight home immediately. Working in Tokyo has made my Japanese much better. Taking on a lot of challenges will broaden my own potential, and let me find a new way of life. I want to tackle challenges seriously while I’m young.

Any job is an opportunity for growth! I worked at airports, and am now in the frontline of corporate sales.

Ko Enshi Job description

In the three years after I joined the company, I worked in rental WiFi stores in Narita and Haneda airports. I was given the job of managing nearly 20 team members from various countries. Haneda Airport in particular works 24 hours a day, so it was tougher than at Narita to find ways to avoid service interruptions. From June 2015, I was moved to the Sales Division, where I manage distributors. I handle about 80 companies, visiting about 20 each week. I basically work alone, and I am responsible for fixing the situation when there is a problem. The challenge I am concentrating most on now is expanding our transactions with major companies, which are the targets of intense competition. When I was starting out in sales work, I failed with things like getting on a train in the wrong direction or visiting the wrong company, but now I am used to moving around in Tokyo. My current goal is to work as an executive candidate when we establish a company in China. I will experience all kinds of things in future, to be ready for opportunities that come my way.

Every day, I learn the warmth of compassion and consideration, and feel my heart growing

Ko Enshi Attractive to work in Tokyo

Since I was a student, I have lived with the strong feeling that I want to live independently and achieve personal growth. In Tokyo, I have found the opportunity to live in a global environment that incorporates the good elements of various countries, and to build my experience regardless of nationality or culture. Through my work, I can feel my emotional growth. For example, the ideas of gratitude and returning favors to people around have taken root in me as I work in Tokyo. I like that approach, and it suits me well. Of course, the same ideas exist in China, but now I can feel them as closer to me in my surroundings. I have only experienced one company so far, but I have also experienced people’s warmth while working in Tokyo. When I had only just joined the company, I wrote “Lately I feel a bit homesick” in the free comment field of an internal company report. After that, I immediately got some follow-up from my workplace superior. I remember being moved by my superior’s attentive compassion and kind words.

Influenced by the advice of my father, who is a manager, I decided to study in Japan.

Ko Enshi Background and up to work in Tokyo

I considered studying overseas when I entered university. I looked at a few candidates other than Japan, but I got some advice from my father, who manages a construction company. He said Japan is highly respected internationally, and offers superior studies. Ultimately, safety was one of the factors I took into account when I chose Japan. After deciding to study in Japan, I studied for a year and a half at a Japanese language school in Tianjin, and then entered a university in Yamanashi prefecture. The only image I had of Japan was of rows of modern buildings, from what I had seen on TV, and I remember how it felt to discover that Japan had countryside too. When I visited Tokyo for the first time in the summer of my first student year, it was densely crowded with many people. My impression was that the stations were the most amazing thing! I was used to the tranquil scenery of Yamanashi, so the contrast was huge. At university, I studied marketing, accounting, and economic management in the Modern Business Department. I also participated keenly in my internship and learned the basics of how to work in a company and how members of society think. At the job-hunting stage, many of those around me went back home to find work, partly prompted by their parents’ wishes, but I chose to get a job in Tokyo. I chose Tokyo because I thought of it as a place with many opportunities. I was thinking of getting a job at a company with a global atmosphere. I attended briefings by communications companies, and I joined XCom Global because I was attracted by its corporate culture, the job opportunities I could experience, and the potential career steps. After working at airports, I now work in sales at headquarters.

The good thing about Tokyo is that people can enjoy it in ways that suit them, whether that’s lively or slow.

Ko Enshi Attractive to live in Tokyo

Sometimes I’m very active at the weekend, going out to have fun with my friends, but sometimes I take it easy at home. If I go out, it’s often for shopping or eating out in Shinjuku or Ikebukuro. Recently I’ve come to like Tokyo’s Odaiba area. It’s by the sea, so it has an open feeling, even though it’s in the same city. I like the sea, so sometime I go a bit further afield from Tokyo, to Minato Mirai in Yokohama. The made in Japan products around me are very popular now, and I think they attract the world’s attention. In Tokyo I can buy popular cosmetics, clothes and electrical appliances for much less than they cost overseas. It’s also easy for me to choose safe foods that I can trust. I have recently been moved by Japan’s culture of hospitality. When I was invited to a friend’s house for the New Year holiday, I received an otoshidama (*) gift. I was accepted like a family member, and it gave me a really warm feeling. If there’s one thing I struggle with in daily life, it’s keigo (honorific language) in the Japanese language. I still have difficulty with it, so I study it by listening to the TV or online news on the Internet during my morning commute or while making preparations. I want to work hard and improve my Japanese.
* Gift items or money exchanged to celebrate the New Year.

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